Tag Archives: Tanzania

Congratulations on 10 (now 12!) Olympic Medals🥇🥇🥈🥈🥈🥈🥉🥉🥉🥉🥉🥉Update from Taiwan 😷

Yes, huge congratulations to Taiwan on their biggest haul ever: 12 Olympic medals! To be selected for the Olympics is a huge achievement, and to get a medal, any medal, is an extra ~ and all deserve praise and encouragement. Taiwan won 5 medals at each of the 2 previous Olympics, and this time, they’ve already doubled those records with 12. The country is so bursting with pride, and social media is buzzing with excitement every evening as matches and games are broadcast live – and as Taiwan time is only one hour behind Tokyo – so the whole country can watch in real time. Well done everyone!

The medals: 2 Gold, 4 Silver, 6 Bronze
🥇GOLD: Women’s 59kg Weightlifting: Kuo Hsing-Chun (郭婞淳).
🥇GOLD: Men’s Doubles Badminton: Lee Yang (李洋) & Wang Chi-Lin (王齊麟)
🥈SILVER: Men’s Archery Team: Tang Chih-Chun (湯智鈞), Wei Chun-Heng (魏均珩) & Deng Yu-Cheng (鄧宇成)
🥈SILVER: Men’s 60 kg Judo: Yang Yung-Wei (楊勇緯)
🥈SILVER: Men’s Pommel Horse: Lee Chih-Kai (李智凱)
🥈SILVER: Women’s Singles Badminton: Tai Tzu-Ying (戴資穎)
🥉BRONZE: Mixed Doubles Table Tennis: Lin Yun-Ju (林昀儒) & Cheng I- Ching (鄭怡靜)
🥉BRONZE: Women’s -57kg Taekwondo: Lo Chia-Ling (羅嘉翎)
🥉BRONZE: Women’s 64kg Weightlifting: Chen Wen-Huei (陳玟卉)
🥉BRONZE: Men’s Golf Individual Stroke Play: Pan Cheng-Tsung (潘政琮)

Added on Wed. Aug. 4: 🥉BRONZE: Women’s Fly (48-51kg) Boxing: Huang Hsiao-Wen (黃筱雯)

Added on Fri. Aug. 6: 🥉BRONZE: Women’s Kumite -55kg Karate: Wen Tzu-Yun (文姿云)

First-ever medals for Taiwan in judo, badminton, pommel horse, golf, boxing and karate!

Final Tally: Taiwan ended at No. 34 in the overall medals table, below Georgia and above Turkey.

Taiwan @ Tokyo Olympics (screenshots taken from President Tsai Ing-Wen’s Instagram)

For political reasons, Taiwan participates in the Olympics as ‘Chinese Taipei’, but during the Olympics Opening Ceremony on July 23, Japan’s main broadcaster NHK introduced the team as ‘Taiwan’, and in response received a message of thanks from the President of Taiwan, Tsai Ing-Wen. Each team was introduced in accordance with Japan’s 50-tone sound phonetic system, so whereas ‘Chinese Taipei’ would have entered the arena under chi (チ), instead the team entered the arena under ta (タ) for ‘Taiwan’. Everyone here is so happy, thank you Japan!

Taiwan’s official colours on a balloon left down at the beach!

President Tsai is actually one of the most enthusiastic supporters of Taiwan’s Olympic team. Her social media is full of photos of each athlete, along with words of congratulations and encouragement – she even spoke to Tai Tzu-Ying after her badminton final, when she just missed out on gold. As far as I can see, not many other world leaders have anywhere near the amount of Olympic coverage on their social media accounts. ☺️ Kudos Taiwan!

Of the 68 competitors from Taiwan at the Olympics, 13 are indigenous. Yang Yung-wei (楊勇緯), who won the judo silver medal is from the Paiwan tribe, and Kuo Hsing-chun (郭婞淳), who won gold for weightlifting, is Amis. Each of the 68 athletes has their own story to tell, and will be forever remembered as Olympians. One of the most moving stories is that of Taiwanese flyweight boxer Huang Hsiao-wen (黃筱雯); see this report: “Taiwanese boxer caps rise from humble beginnings with Olympic medal“. But when all the athletes return home, whatever their achievement in Tokyo, they are still subject to Taiwan’s strict quarantine regulations, albeit modified, since they were under strict regulations in Tokyo and are all double vaccinated. Instead of 14 days in hotel quarantine, followed by 7 days self-health management at home, they do 7 days hotel quarantine, followed by a PCR test and then 14 days of self-health management at a place of their choosing – and their first breakfast on arrival is provided by President Tsai. So no grand family reunions just yet!

Two of the medal winners are local to this area. Wen Tzu-yun (文姿云), the Karate Bronze Medal winner is from Tamsui, while Lo Chia-Ling (羅嘉翎), the Taekwondo Bronze Medal winner, is from Sanzhi, and both towns have been enjoying the limelight for the last few days. St. John’s University (SJU) is about midway between the two places. This is SJU and the sea nearby, photos all taken in the last few weeks ….

The Olympics has provided some welcome relief from worries about the pandemic. It has also coincided with Taiwan moving down from Level 3 alert to Level 2, which officially happened on Tuesday July 27, but instead of everyone rushing out to make the most of their new freedoms, instead they are staying inside to watch the Olympic matches live on TV. Under Level 2, we can now have up to 50 people meeting inside and up to 100 meeting outside, allowing for social distancing, and facemasks must still be worn everywhere, except for when eating and drinking.

Beaches are now open, and sports centres, but with no swimming. Restaurants are open for dining-in, but subject to local conditions, meaning they can be closed if there is a surge of cases in the area, like happened in Chiayi a few days ago, a cluster of 13 cases led to closure of all indoor dining in the whole of Chiayi City and County. Now that kindergartens and daycare centre staff are mostly all recently vaccinated, so they are allowed to open, but state schools are still on summer holidays. Our church kindergartens are opening up, and church services can now start again in person, as long as the rules are followed. We even have an ordination service this Friday (49 people allowed to attend), our first gathering for several months. Watch this space!

Fortunately, since we moved to Level 2 a week ago, confirmed cases have remained low. Today we have 16 domestic and 3 imported cases, with 2 deaths. Today’s new COVID-19 cases bring the total in Taiwan to 15,721, of which 14,230 are domestic infections reported since May 15, when the country first recorded more than 100 cases in a single day. To date, 791 people have died of COVID-19, including 779 since May 15. The vaccination campaign continues apace, 34% of the population have now received their first dose.

And the other distraction from the pandemic has been the rain – and the typhoon. Typhoon In-Fa passed near northern Taiwan the weekend before last, and although the winds were not too strong, the rains were torrential and there was flooding in some areas. The typhoon circulated out over the Pacific Ocean for several days before finally moving NW towards Shanghai on Saturday July 24. Down at our local seaside area, the waves clearly came right over the top of the embankment and left a ton of flotsam and jetsam lying on the road below. It’s been raining most days ever since, and has led to serious flooding and landslides in southern Taiwan. The News is reporting that this current low pressure area might well form into a typhoon in the next few days. This is the local scene after the typhoon, and since…

As a result of all the rain, there are now snails much in evidence, taking perilous journeys across the roads in the area – I counted about 20 this morning. By the afternoon, sadly most will have been crushed under the wheels of a motorcycle or car. It’s useless to speculate what on earth they are doing and why they risk their lives for no clear purpose other than to just cross the road!

The snails are not the only ones that currently seem to be finding it hard to know which way to turn. We have lots of overseas students here at SJU, and unlike the Taiwan students, they haven’t been able to go home over the summer. in fact, they couldn’t go home over Chinese New Year either, due to strict quarantine regulations at both ends, and many are getting homesick, the Malaysians in particular. The pandemic has meant there’s no summer jobs here, and with Covid raging in Malaysia, many of their families back home are struggling financially, and not able to send them money. We are providing food coupons for 16 of them, and with SJU willing for them to continue studying online this coming semester, so several of them have found cheap flights and have decided to return home to Malaysia, planning to return to Taiwan after Chinese New Year 2022. Do pray for them, and for all those struggling in the pandemic. This includes our SJU student recruitment for the new academic year – though not finalized yet, the pandemic is sure to have had a big effect.

Finally, in case you think I’m totally biased towards Taiwan in the Olympics, well there’s also the UK, but they are doing really well anyway, so now I’m turning my attention to Tanzania. There are only 3 Tanzanian athletes in this Olympics, all running in the marathon, being held this coming weekend. Apparently, London marathon bronze medalist in 2017, Alphonce Simbu, is Tanzania’s main hope for a medal, Other marathoners in the team are Failuna Matanga and Gabriel Geay. Filbert Bayi and Suleiman Nyambui won silver medals in the Moscow Olympics in 1980, so it’s now 41 years since Tanzania won an Olympic medal. Fortunately our local supermarket, Carrefour has been selling Tanzanian chocolate – so I am all stocked up, ready to cheer on the Tanzanian marathoners!

Go Taiwan, Go Tanzania, Go Malaysia, Go UK, Go Everyone, Yes GO!

Sunday August 8: For Taiwanese athletes, Tokyo Olympics their best ever

Results for Tanzania’s Olympic athletes: Men’s Marathon: Alphonce Simbu Time: 2:11:35 Position: No. 7 (The winner, Eliud Kipchoge of Kenya came in at 2:08:38) Gabriel Geay did not finish / Women’s Marathon: Failuna Matanga Time: 2:33:58 Position: No. 24

Monday September 6: Taiwan won one medal at the Paralympics: Tien Shiau-wen (田曉雯) won bronze in Table Tennis.

From Taiwan to London ~ with love!

This was really quite some weekend!

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What you need to know (according to Wikipedia): Lambeth Palace, London is the official London residence of the Archbishop of Canterbury in England.  And the Archbishop of Canterbury is the senior bishop and principal leader of the Church of England, the symbolic head of the worldwide Anglican Communion and the diocesan bishop of the Diocese of Canterbury…

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And this past weekend was my first time for both.  My first ever visit to Lambeth Palace, AND my first time to meet the Archbishop of Canterbury.  YES!

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This year, Taiwan is marking the 60th anniversary of the 823 Artillery Shell Bombardment of Kinmen, and on Monday September 3, I was honoured to present an artillery shell cross on behalf of the Bishop of Taiwan, David J. H. Lai, to the Archbishop of Canterbury, Justin Welby, during a lunchtime Eucharist in the chapel at Lambeth Palace. It was a really wonderful occasion, and Archbishop Justin and his staff made me feel really welcome.  Later that day, the archbishop wrote in his Facebook post, ‘The cross shows us the transformation of hatred into love. Today I was given a special gift by the Diocese of Taiwan – a cross made from artillery shells. Made as part of the diocese’s peacemaking ministry, these crosses show us that the love of Jesus turns hate into love, and war into peace. Thank you Catherine Lee for presenting this cross on behalf of the Bishop of Taiwan, David Lai.’

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This is the artillery shell cross on the Lambeth Palace chapel altar after the service…

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I also had a short tour of some of the other rooms, the crypt chapel, and the state drawing room. Many of these rooms were badly damaged during World War II, so extensive restoration work had to take place after the war. Fascinating place to visit!

The chapel has an amazing ceiling, ‘From Darkness to Light’ (Leonard Henry Rosoman, 1988)…

Before the service at the chapel, Archbishop Justin introduced me as working for Church Mission Society (CMS).  In fact, the Archbishop of Canterbury is the patron of CMS.  During the service, we prayed for our CMS executive leader, Philip Mounstephen, who has just been appointed as the next Bishop of Truro, Cornwall, and for the CMS trustees as they start the search for a new leader.  Archbishop Justin also mentioned that before I worked in Taiwan, I had been in Mwanza and Dodoma in Tanzania, places he knows well.  Ah, yes, I was just so happy to hear the Archbishop of Canterbury mention Mwanza and Dodoma!

Y’know, many of my closest friendships date from my years in Tanzania, and I’ve spent this weekend in London catching up with some of them, including Tim and Sarah and their family ~ and I’m grateful to them for their generous hospitality this weekend.  They are long-time members of Brandon Baptist Church, Camberwell, S. London….

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The minister of Brandon, Steve, kindly invited me to speak at their church on Sunday morning – and I showed the congregation the artillery shell cross that I was about to present to the Archbishop of Canterbury the following day.  Steve followed up my sermon by sharing how this artillery shell cross and its message, of hatred transformed into peace, is so relevant for their local community, struggling with unprecedented levels of knife crime and violence.  And many of the prayers of the congregation during the service were also related to their desire for peace on the streets of London. The words written on the wooden artillery shell cross stand say in English and Chinese, “Blessed are the peacemakers, for they will be called children of God.” Matthew 5:9.  Yes, indeed.

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The Brandon Baptist Church congregation were so lovely, and those originally from Nigeria, Ghana and Jamaica in particular were wearing the most amazing variety of stunning outfits. Had to take some photos. Loved them all!

After the service, Tim and Sarah took us on a wonderful outing and picnic to the Horniman Museum, in Forest Hill, where we had a very lively and colourful carnival to entertain us as we ate…

The museum is really incredible. There is THE very huge and very famous walrus in the centre, and all around are a real mix of interesting things from all over the world. Highly recommended. And it’s not often that I recommend museums, or even go in them to find out. So make sure you go. Just make sure you don’t touch the walrus or sit on that iceberg! 🤣🤣🤣

The walrus even appears on the street art sign (by Lionel Stanhope) of Forest Hill under the railway bridge, he’s a local celebrity!

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Actually my London weekend got off to a really lively, exciting and fun start, when I had the chance to meet up with Eshita and her parents, who I knew from Isamilo Primary School, Mwanza.  She was one of my pupils there when she was, well, just 5-6 years old! Y’know, not everyone feels really comfortable meeting up with their former primary school teachers, but Eshita is completely delightful and I am honoured that she arranged to meet me, at a delicious S. Indian restaurant (Sagar in Hammersmith).   It was the first time I’ve seen her parents since I was in Mwanza, so we had much to catch up on.  Thank you Eshita!

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Also visited a few more friends over the weekend, and the rest of the time, I spent walking round London. And on the underground. And on the bus. Seeing all the sights. Catching up after 3 years away. Seeing what’s new. And what’s not. Loved it all!

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So, here goes.  I went to Southwark Cathedral. There was only one other person in there, a lady taking photos of the cathedral cat. The cathedral is free to go in. Make the most of it, guys, this is a cathedral, and what’s more, it’s FREE!

And across the Millennium Bridge….

To St. Paul’s Cathedral, where the Bishop of London was in the middle of rededicating the cathedral bells…

Along by the river…

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Past the Globe Theatre…

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The Houses of Parliament, under restoration and renovation…

The London Eye…

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Westminster Abbey..

Methodist Central Hall (good coffee shop in the basement)…

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Around Buckingham Palace…

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St. James’ Park…

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Kensington Palace…

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The Round Pond and Hyde Park – swans and geese everywhere!

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The Albert Memorial and Royal Albert Hall…

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Christo’s beautiful art installation in Hyde Park, called ‘The Mastaba’, and made out of over 7,000 oil drums…

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And more art at Carrie Riechardt’s mosaic house out at Chiswick, ‘The Treatment Rooms’…

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Piccadilly, St. James’ Church and Piccadilly Circus….

And not forgetting Trafalgar Square, and St. Martin-in-the-Fields….

And finally on Monday afternoon, the last place to visit was my most favouritest shop in all of London, Stanfords in Long Acre, near Leicester Square where they sell maps of every kind and every place and every style. Go there if you want to travel. Go there even if you don’t want to travel, and maybe you’ll get inspired. Could have spent a fortune, but restrained myself.  Had tea instead, lol.  Ah, I love that shop!

‘When a man is tired of London, he is tired of life’, so said Samuel Johnson in 1777 and it’s been true ever since. And for women too, of course. Tired of London? Ain’t gonna happen, I’m sure of that. As long as you have legs that carry you, you can walk around that great city seeing everything. And on a sunny September weekend, with blue skies, friends and fellowship to enjoy, what more can London do to make us smile?  Thank you London, and all my friends in London, you’ve done it again!  YES!

Advent Word, Day 12 ‘promise’

Day 12 #promise #應許 Friday December 9

‘God gives us the responsibility of doing something ourselves about those faithless fears and worldly anxieties that are holding us back. We don’t have to do this alone. We have God’s promise of holding our hand and of helping us’.

上帝有時要我們負責,做一些自己全無把握,心生憂慮,甚至裹足不前的事。但我們無須「重擔一肩挑」獨力苦撐;我們有神的應許,祂會伸出援手給予必要的幫助。

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Ah, Tanzania ~ a wonderful country of great promise.  Pray for Tanzania today on this their Independence Day ~ December 9, 1961  ~ 55 today!