Welcome to East Anglia!

IMG_8559

East Anglia is a land of big skies. They go on forever, and change colour frequently at this time of year as an orange sunrise gives way to blue skies ~ that change to grey to black, and the storm clouds come, the rain pours down and then the sun comes out, leaving rainbows and white fluffy clouds. Never boring, in fact I spent half of the weekend chasing skies of different colours all over everywhere!

IMG_8370

At this time of year, the fields are full of sugar beet – or corn stalks after the harvest, or green grass of the common land, being grazed by a few friendly horses.  Cows too, nearby…

IMG_8416

The village of Mellis in north Suffolk is one of my CMS Link Churches, and I’ve just been staying there for the weekend. Actually it’s part of the benefice now called South Hartismere, and one of 4 parishes that my father took care of as vicar, way back in the 9 years before he retired in 1996. These days there are 8 parishes, wonderfully taken care of by Rev. Julia Lall, and they’ve been supporting me for many years. On previous visits, I’ve always stayed with Julia, churchwarden of Thornham Magna, but this time, I’ve had the honour of staying with the churchwarden of Mellis, Betty and her husband, David. So hospitable and welcoming. Even the cats love to share their space with visitors. Thank you!  This is Betty lighting the candles in the church, ready for the service, with the church teddy bear, Fr. Ted all ready too…

IMG_8543

Mellis is very unusual, in that central to the village is a huge unfenced common, and virtually all the houses are built around the edges of the common. Most are hidden behind hedges and hard to find, with just the roofs peeping out above the trees, many of them thatched. This being Suffolk, lots of the houses are pink. Suffolk is famous for its pink houses, due to the whitewash traditionally being mixed with oxblood – as a binding agent, or maybe to ward off evil spirits, or both.  These two are actually in the neighbouring village of Thornham Magna ~ the left photo is of the Four Horseshoes…

Also peeping out behind the trees on the edge of Mellis common is St. Mary’s Church. This area has lots of churches dedicated to St. Mary.  The church took ages to find, despite lots of signposts to ‘St. Mary’s Church’! Eventually I found it hiding behind the trees, and on Sunday at 10:30 am, it was the Mellis Harvest Festival – in the pouring rain, which stopped mid-afternoon, and the sun came out. But the church looked stunning anyway. We had a lovely service, with children from the local school and over 40 people there. I did the talk and there was sherry on offer afterwards. Sherry!

IMG_8551

Earlier on the Sunday morning, I also preached at the 8:30 am communion service at Thornham Magna, (also St. Mary’s, but Mary Magdalene) led by the vicar, Julia. I presented her with an artillery shell cross from Taiwan, also one for lay reader Jean, in honour of it being the 50th anniversary next year of women first becoming lay readers. These ladies are doing a great job in rural Suffolk!

IMG_8522

Thornham Parva is not far away, the church is really incredible – and very famous, due to its thatched roof, and the retable inside. And of course, surprise, surprise, it’s also dedicated to St. Mary…

IMG_8677

And finally there’s Gislingham Church, yes, another St. Mary. This one was closed for repairs. Gislingham is the largest village in the immediate area.

IMG_8696

The telephone boxes of this area are interesting, the one at Mellis is now all stained glass showing local nature scenes, while the one at Thornham Magna is a bookswap…

And just up the road, in the neighbouring benefice of North Hartismere is my good friend, Adrian Watkins, he’s been vicar there for the last 3 years, based at Oakley.  Adrian was one of our favourite regional managers at Church Mission Society (CMS) in London and then Oxford, but then he left for theological training. Really miss him at CMS. So I just had to visit him. What’s more, he’s a successor to Rev. Christopher Idle, who was vicar at Oakley and some of the other churches in the area – and whose 80th birthday party and book launch I had attended last weekend in London. Gosh, it’s a small world! Adrian has a very large rectory and a very small dog. Quite some contrast. And he has lots of special hens and guinea fowl with all sorts of unusual names. And y’know what, his church at Oakley is not (repeat, not!) dedicated to St. Mary. St. Nicholas, in fact. Yippee!

IMG_8464

And what else? Well, a visit to northern Suffolk would not be complete without a visit to Norwich, so that was where I went on Friday on my way to Mellis. Actually Suffolk is in the Diocese of Edmundsbury and Ipswich, but Norwich is, well, THE place to go. I went first to visit a friend, then down to Norwich Cathedral. It’s quite a place. Free to get in, suggested donation of £5. A bargain, guys! There’s a labyrinth in the cloisters, 3 beautiful modern windows and an amazing font kind of made of a chocolate machine (yes, true!), and the most stunning glass door to St. Catherine’s Chapel, with words from T. S. Eliot’s Four Quartets engraved on the door. Not easy to photograph, but well worth seeing. Must visit! And one day I hope they’ll offer tower / steeple tours like lots of other cathedrals. I just love tower tours!

There’s plenty of other stuff in Norwich. Nearby is Mother Julian’s cell in a church. I went to check it out, but let me be honest, I didn’t like it, so there’s no photos to show you.  But I can highly recommend visiting Colchester, where I was visiting my good friends, Shelagh and Richard, for 2 days, in-between visiting London and Suffolk. The day we visited the town it was dull and a bit wet, but there’s tons of old Roman stuff to see, the castle and the walls and a huge number of churches. Some have been converted to music centres and theatres, but the most interesting was St. Helen’s Chapel which was built in the grounds of the Roman theatre, possibly by King Offa in the 8th century, then restored by the Normans in 1076, and these days is used as the town’s Greek Orthodox Church, with an amazing icon of St. Helen of Colchester, the town’s patron saint – she was mother of Constantine.  It’s a real surprise to enter the church and see what’s inside!

So a wonderful time had in East Anglia. Thanks to everyone for making me feel so welcome. This was the view as I left the area yesterday heading for the flatter lands of the fens. But hoping to be back in East Anglia in a few weeks time – for Part 2!

IMG_8704

2 thoughts on “Welcome to East Anglia!”

  1. Dear Catherine,

    Looks wonderful! It’s good to see that Adrian is doing well ☺

    Great to follow your UK adventure!!!

    Blessings

    Anne

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.