Thanksgiving Turkey Celebrations! 感恩節快樂!

🦃 Happy Thanksgiving!🦃 🦃 感恩節快樂!🦃

And let’s celebrate the traditional American way, which includes turkey ~ so these are our Thanksgiving Turkeys, made last Friday at Xingren Elementary School, each child writing what they are thankful for – photos supplied by the school. Just in time for Thanksgiving on Thursday November 25.

This may be the first time I’ve ever really taught anything about Thanksgiving, but it’s on the curriculum for English classes in Taiwan’s elementary schools, and I am helping out with some classes once a month, so here we go! This is possibly my favourite…

Actually, Halloween is also on the curriculum, but I am distinctly less keen on celebrating that – so for October’s class on Halloween we focused on ‘What are you afraid of?’ which included everything from cockroaches to ghosts, from earthquakes to Covid-19, followed by ‘What do you do when you’re afraid?’, which included hiding under the table in an earthquake – holding onto a table leg, running away from fierce dogs, asking for help, being brave, and even maybe praying ~ as appropriate. It all fits very nicely with the well-practiced earthquake drills and pandemic precautions that are now part of daily life. And we finished with a traditional but pandemic-friendly Halloween game of stacking cups…

As you will see from the photos above, facemasks are compulsory all day and every day, though we are allowed to take them off for photos. Apart from a few old Covid-19 cases that have resurfaced when the person went to be tested for travel overseas or a hospital stay, Taiwan has actually not had any domestic Covid-19 cases now for about 2 months, so that is good news. Most days, the figures are about 8-10 imported cases, no domestic cases, no deaths. Border controls continue to be very strict, with 2 weeks of mandatory hotel quarantine on arrival in separate rooms (even if you’re a couple), followed by a week of self-health management at home. Some modifications are being made to cope with the thousands expected home to celebrate Chinese New Year, they’ll be allowed to do their second week of quarantine at home, but with huge fines promised to any who break the rules. Meanwhile vaccinations continue apace, and our students are now in the middle of receiving their second dose.

Local seaside at St. John’s University

Earlier this month, we made our first visit since May to the international students at Chung-Chou University in central Taiwan for a service. They’re from Uganda and Eswatini, and during the Level 3 Restrictions in the summer, they were grounded for several months in the factories where they work part-time earning their school fees. While all the girls still look the same, the boys are definitely fatter than I remember them ~ no exercise for months! After the service we usually have pizza, and they said they’re really enjoying eating something different – and how much they appreciate their classes now that they’re in-person once again.

You can see from the photo that the students are all wrapped up, even though for me, coming from north Taiwan, it actually felt very warm that day. It’s autumn, and the weather fluctuates almost daily from hot to cold, wet to dry. On Saturday, and in fact every Saturday for the past month, it’s been rainy, foggy and windy. These were the autumn leaves up in the mountains this past Saturday, wet but very beautiful….

Today, Monday, it is again driving rain and wind, with temperatures dropping by the minute, forecast to be 13°C by tomorrow. But yesterday was a day of hot, sunny weather, 30°C! I was doing the sermon at the English service at St. John’s Cathedral, Taipei followed by doughnuts and Bible Study, then decided to cycle home by You Bike – 35km along a very meandering river path, past some new street art and all the way to Tamsui Fisherman’s Wharf…

I also stopped off at the Guandu Flower Fields en route. These are normally rice fields but the government pays the farmers to grow flowers during the autumn instead of a second crop of rice, and then they open the area to the public. There were thousands of people at the flower fields, on the bicycle paths, at the beach, everywhere.

We’ve also had some beautiful sunsets, this one taken a few weeks ago in Tamsui of the statue of Rev. George L. MacKay (1844-1901), Taiwan’s most famous missionary, at the place where he landed in Taiwan in 1871, with his Bible and doctor’s bag…

Also the Shezi Bridge, Taipei…

And 2 more local sunsets, taken down at our beach….

And in-between times, we’ve had all sorts of celebration meals! In Taichung, my good friend Miao-Shia and her sister, Shu-Miao have moved to a new home, and invited me there to celebrate. The food was so amazing, all home-cooked! Interestingly, Shu-Miao was working in Uganda these past 2 years with Sudanese refugees, and the lady in Uganda who helped process their visas etc is the aunt of one of the students at Chung-Chou University who always comes to our services ~ so when Shu-Miao came home earlier in the year, she brought him back a gift from his aunt. Small world!

Then, Bishop Chang hosted our October Birthday Lunch at the diocesan office, at which we celebrated Ethan’s 2nd birthday and Jian-Jia’s 60th….

And in November, we celebrated Hsiao-Yen’s 60th birthday, also at the diocesan office….

And to bring it full circle, our good friends Sheerah, Yu-Wei, Ethan and Eva invited me last week ~ along with newly-married Yu-Lin and San-Yuan ~ to their home for a Malaysian meal in honour of Thanksgiving. Wow, it was so special!

Sheerah is from West Malaysia, so she cooked her hometown food while we entertained the kids. There was Uncle Wah chicken curry, stir-fried marinated pork strips, braised pork ribs with white radish, stir-fried vegetables and miso soup. Everything was oh so delicious!

Sheerah had ordered this amazing cake for dessert, ‘Sea salt cheese lava pandan cake 爆漿海鹽芝士奶蓋斑斕蛋糕’. The green pandan cake is Malaysia’s national cake, and with the sea salt cheese lava added, it was a delightful mix of sweet and savoury. Loved it!

What a great Thanksgiving Celebration, and we even had a turkey – but I’m holding it cos it kept falling off the wall!

Even if we’re not American, even if we don’t normally celebrate Thanksgiving, even if we’re adamant that turkeys are only for Christmas, hey really, what’s not to like? We can give thanks to God for family, friends, food, health and strength, and for Taiwan being relatively safe in this pandemic so that life can resume and go on. So much to give thanks for ~ not least for these bright yellow turkeys!

So wishing you all a very….

🦃 Happy Thanksgiving!🦃 🦃 感恩節快樂!🦃

6 thoughts on “Thanksgiving Turkey Celebrations! 感恩節快樂!”

  1. Thank you Catherine. Very beautiful photos with such rich colours everywhere even in the food, and lovely smiling faces.

  2. What a fun packed Thanksgiving everyone seems to have had. I love the turkeys and the other craftworks.
    Did you know that Rev Kevin Partington and Sandra have caught Covid? She is in hospital as her oxygen levels were very low.
    Prayers please. Love from Anne x

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